Feb 12, 2020 12:04 PM

Riley County Arrest Report Wednesday Feb. 12

Posted Feb 12, 2020 12:04 PM
Bomani Gordon has previous convictions for burglary and  interference with law enforcement, according to the Kansas Department of Corrections
Bomani Gordon has previous convictions for burglary and  interference with law enforcement, according to the Kansas Department of Corrections

The following is a summary of arrests, citations by the Riley County Police Department. Those arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

MITCHELL TAYLOR HENDERSON, 30, Manhattan, Driving under the influence of drugs/alcohol; 2nd conviction; blood/breath .08 >; Bond $2000

CARNECIA DECHEA ROBERTSON, 22, Manhattan,Theft of property or services; Value less than  $1,500; All Other Larceny; Bond $5000

SHUNTELL SAMONE SCOTT, 31, Manhattan,  Forgery; Making or altering a written instrument; 41st conviction Theft of property lost or mislaid; Value less than  $1,000; Purse-Snatching, X CRIM FINANCIAL CARD;W/O CONSENT  $1K-25K Theft of property or services; Value $1,500 to  $25,000; All Other Larceny , Making false information; Bond $3000

TYRELL RASHUN SCOTT, 27, Manhattan, Forgery; Making or altering a written instrument; unknown conviction Making false information  Criminal use of financial card; W/o consent of 1 owner $1000 to $25,000 Theft of property or services; Value $1,500 to $25,000; All Other Larceny Theft of property lost or mislaid; Value less than $1,000; All Other Larceny; Bond $3000

SHELBIE LOUISE DURHAM, 23, Manhattan, Probation Violation; Bond $750

BOMANI OWUSU GORDON, 25, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Held without bond

MASON OLIVER ALLEN JACKSON, 18, Failure to Appear; Bond $1000

AARON JAMES MIDDAUGH, 21, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $750

CITATION REPORT

YI CHUNLIN, 23, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT CLAFLIN RD & HARTFORD RD IN MANHATTAN FOR IMPROPER TURNING (9-49) ON FEBRUARY 7, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 7:33 PM.

CYNTHIA ARGO, 47, OF WATERVILLE, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 6600 BLK TUTTLE CREEK BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR IMPROPR DRIVE ON LANED ROADWAY (08-1522) ON FEBRUARY 7, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 6:55 PM.

SINJIN EURBIN, 21, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 400 BLK RILEY AVE IN OGDEN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 2:33 PM.

FREDERICK MOESSINGER JR, 29, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 400 BLK RILEY AVE IN OGDEN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON FEBRUARY 10, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY12:30 PM.

SHELBY ABTS, 21, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 1000 BLK TUTTLE CREEK BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR FOLLOWING TOO CLOSELY (8-47) ON FEBRUARY 8, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY10:20 AM.

JAMES LEMLEY, 45, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 3400 BLK KIMBALL AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 2:04 PM.

ZACHARY SMITH, 21, OF FT RILEY, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 2800 BLK FORT RILEY BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 7:37 PM.

MEGAN WHEELER, 25, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 1000 BLK S SETH CHILD RD IN MANHATTAN FOR VEHICLE TAGS-EXPIRE/ILLEGBLE (19-198) AND FOR NO PROOF OF MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY (19-200) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 4:42 PM.

KATIE BOWERS, 29, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 1200 BLK MARLATT AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR NO PROOF OF MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY (19-200) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 6:05 PM.

QUINN BONGE, 22, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT KEARNEY ST & N MANHATTAN AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR FTY RIGHT OF WAY STOP/YIELD (159) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 8:29 PM.

HEATH ROMINE, 42, OF LEONARDVILLE, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 5400 BLK TUTTLE CREEK BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR MAXIMUM SPEED LIMITS (08-1558) ON FEBRUARY 10, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY10:11 PM.

AKSHAY MHATRE, 21, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 5400 BLK TUTTLE CREEK BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR MAXIMUM SPEED LIMITS (08-1558) ON FEBRUARY 10, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY10:53 PM.

ZACHARY STORM, 21, OF MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT 1615 FAIRCHILD AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR UNNECESSARY NOISE STANDARD (22-55) ON FEBRUARY 9, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY11:29 PM.

KAYCEE GOODALL, 29, OF JUNCTION CITY, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 2700 BLK FORT RILEY BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON FEBRUARY 10, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 9:11 A

Continue Reading Little Apple Post
Feb 12, 2020 12:04 PM
Plan now to assure successful calving season
Producers should consider shortening the breeding and calving season by controlling the duration of bull exposure to the herd, breeding first-calf heifers earlier than mature cows, matching herd genetics to the environment and making committed culling decisions. Photo courtesy KSRE" />
Producers should consider shortening the breeding and calving season by controlling the duration of bull exposure to the herd, breeding first-calf heifers earlier than mature cows, matching herd genetics to the environment and making committed culling decisions. Photo courtesy KSRE

MANHATTAN – Cattle producers who have not yet started the spring calving season still have time to plan ahead, and a Kansas State University veterinarian notes that could make a big difference in having a successful year.

“This is the time for a pre-emptive strike,” said A.J. Tarpoff, a beef veterinarian with K-State Research and Extension. “If you haven’t started calving yet on your operation, now is the time to start thinking about what you can do to be ready.”

Tarpoff noted that producers need to make sure they have the necessary supplies on hand, which may require buying or repairing items and facilities. Then, he adds, set in motion a plan to manage the birth of the new calves.

“Calving books are a phenomenal tool,” Tarpoff said. “It could be just a little pocketbook where you write down who calved, when they calved, if there was difficulty, and whether it was a male or female coming out. There is a lot of information that we can capture about the birthing process so that we’re able to make better decisions within our herd in the future.”

One of the newer management techniques that can lead to successful calving is to feed cows at dusk. “There have been several research studies that show reliable results that a higher percentage of animals are born during daylight hours when we feed the cow in the late evening hours,” Tarpoff said.

Feeding late in the evening, he said, will help decrease midnight or early morning births, which are hard on workers and can make the birth more complicated if there are difficulties.

Tarpoff hosted a series of calving schools across Kansas over the last several weeks to help the state’s producers be adequately prepared to bring in as many healthy animals as possible. The final session for this season was video-streamed on Facebook Live. A recording of that session can be seen on the K-State Research and Extension Facebook page.

One of his recommendations is that producers use a cooler to store tools and equipment: “On cold days and nights, the cooler will help equipment to stay nice and warm. We can close it up and know that our equipment is not going to freeze,” he said.

Tarpoff said producers should check calving chains or obstetric straps for rust, sharp spots or fraying. He also suggests having multiple sets on hand in case there are multiple births at once. The straps should be cleaned, disinfected and hung to dry after each use.

“Once those straps are dried, put them in a closed container so that you don’t re-contaminate them by accident,” he said. “Then, throw them back into your cooler kit.”

Producers should have a meeting with their local veterinarian to discuss situations that may occur, and what medicine or other supplies may be needed to handle those. “They can prescribe the products you’ll need and set you up to be a little more prepared,” Tarpoff said.

Producers can also contact their local extension agent or visit KSUBeef.org for more information on getting prepared for spring calving.

How to handle a difficult calving situation

Tarpoff shares the following steps for producers to follow if they experience a difficult calving situation:

During active calving. Once the cow’s water bag breaks, assure that they are making adequate progress toward birth within an hour. Adequate progress means the calf is moving through the birth canal. If there seems to be no progress, it is time to intervene.

How long should I intervene? “First, figure out what is causing the problem,” Tarpoff said. “Usually the calf is not coming through the birth canal quite right.” He said producers should try to intervene for a half hour, gently manipulating the calf’s head, legs or other parts through the birth canal.

Call for help. If problems persist beyond a half hour, call a veterinarian for help. “That’s your best chance to get a live calf on the ground,” Tarpoff said.

“Don’t hesitate to seek assistance when it’s obvious you need it,” Tarpoff said. “For a lot of locations in Kansas, the veterinarian may not be five minutes away. They may be an hour away or they may be on another call. If you communicate with them that you’re having an issue, you’re trying to solve it but it’s not going well, at least it gets it on their radar that they can get to your operation as soon as possible.”