Jan 08, 2020 12:14 PM

Riley County Arrest Report Wednesday Jan. 8

Posted Jan 08, 2020 12:14 PM

The following is a summary of arrests, citations by the Riley County Police Department. Those arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Reginald Grady has previous convictions for aggravated battery and criminal possession of a weapon by a felon, according to the Kansas Dept. of Corrections
Reginald Grady has previous convictions for aggravated battery and criminal possession of a weapon by a felon, according to the Kansas Dept. of Corrections

DAKOTAH JAMES GARNER, 28, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $6,000

SHERMAN MARK SHERIN II, 24, Manhattan, Criminal threat against LEO; Cause terror, evacuation or disruption Battery on LEO; Physical contact with county or city officer on duty  and Interference with LEO; obstruct/resist/oppose felony warrant service or execution; Bond $7,000

QUINTON RANDAL COX, 28, Manhattan,Theft of property or services; Value $1,500 to $25,000; All Other Larceny Theft of property or services; Value less than $1,500; All Other Larceny; Bond $2,000

CORNEAL ARNEZ JOHNSON, 30, Manhattan, PROBATION VIOLATION, Theft of property or services; Value less than $1,500; Shoplifting Interference with LEO; obstruct/resist/oppose misdemeanor warrant service or execution; Bond $2750

DANIEL JONATHAN VALAIKA, 22, Manhattan, Disorderly conduct; Brawling or fighting; Bond $2,000

RICHARD STACY BRANCH JR, 31, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $1,000

NICOLAS MICHAEL OXIOS, 25, Manhattan, Probation Violation and Failure to Appear; Bond $6,000

REGINALD SHERWOOD GRADY, 30, Manhattan, Probation Violation; Bond $5,000

RICHARD MICHAEL ANDERSON, 40, New Cambria, Unlawful to possess 15+ fraudulent retail receipts or UPC labels Attempted theft by deception; Value less than $1,500; Salina Police

STANFORD ALEXANDER KIZER, 30, Lenexa, Failure to Appear; Johnson Co. Sheriff

TYLER SCOTT BOLAND, 20, Manhattan, Failure to Appear (2x) Dickinson County Sheriff

CITATION REPORT

MARKELL JACKSON, 21, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 400 BLK S MANHATTAN AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR WINDSHIELDS; EYE PROTECTION (17-177) ON JANUARY 7, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 7:40 AM.

ANDREW FRANKLIN, 18,  OGDEN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT TUTTLE CREEK BLVD & BLUEMONT AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR DRIVE CANC/SUSP/REV LICENSE (19-194) ON JANUARY 5, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY12:30 AM.

TALLIN LA RUE, 26, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT CASEMENT RD & HAYES DR IN MANHATTAN FOR FTY RIGHT OF WAY STOP/YIELD (159) ON JANUARY 6, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 5:51 PM.

ALEXIS ABRAMS, 22, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 1000 BLK BLUEMONT AVE. IN MANHATTAN FOR VEHICLE TAGS-EXPIRE/ILLEGBLE (19-198) AND FOR NO PROOF OF MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY (19-200) ON JANUARY 6, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 9:50 PM.

JESE MCNEAL, 20, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT N 4TH ST & BLUEMONT AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR FTY RIGHT OF WAY STOP/YIELD (159) ON JANUARY 6, 2,020 AT APPROXIMATELY 6:50 AM.

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Jan 08, 2020 12:14 PM
Why Kansas CO2 emissions are at lowest level in 40 years
A wind turbine rises over Kansas. Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

By BRIAN GRIMMETT, Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — As global carbon dioxide emissions break records, Kansas is headed in the opposite direction — reducing emissions for 10 straight years.

Kansas’ decline is largely due to the rapid adoption of wind energy and a slow move away from coal powered electricity. That is to say: Kansas produces less carbon dioxide, or CO2, the powerful greenhouse gas that’s released into the atmosphere when we burn fossil fuels and is a major driver of climate change.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, Kansas emitted 58.2 million metric tons of CO2 in 2017. That’s good enough to make Kansas only the 31st largest emitter in the U.S.

While it’s below the national average, on a global scale: “Kansas, if it were its own country, would be one of the top 60 CO2 emitters,” said Joe Daniel, an energy analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

So, when Kansas sees a reduction in emissions like it has in the past decade, it matters, he said.

The decline began in 2007, when total CO2 emissions in Kansas peaked at nearly 80 million metric tons.

Where CO2 comes from

So how did the state reduce its annual CO2 emissions by as much as the entire country of Bolivia so quickly? Three graphics explain it all.

First, it’s helpful to know the source of Kansas’ CO2 emissions. In 2017, about half of total CO2 emissions came from burning fossil fuels, such as coal and natural gas, to create electricity. The rest was mostly from burning gasoline and diesel in our cars and trucks.

The recent reductions aren’t transportation-related, because, despite more efficient and cleaner burning engines, additional people and cars have offset the difference. In fact, total transportation emissions in Kansas have barely changed in the past 40 years.

That leaves electric power generation.

The decline of coal

As the graph shows, energy-related CO2 emissions began to plummet in the mid-2000s. Specifically, it’s emissions from coal-fired power plants.

While some of the reductions are likely due to plant upgrades and federal environmental regulations that forced coal plants to clean up what was coming out of their smoke stacks, it’s mostly because plants burned less coal.

Coal plants in Kansas only produced about 20,000 gigawatt hours of electricity in 2018, compared to an average of about 35,000 gigawatt hours during the 2000s.

Daniel said the decline is largely due to economics. With the fast growth of cheap wind-generated electricity in Kansas, it’s become less profitable to run coal plants.

“I don’t think a month has gone by where I haven’t read a study about the poor economics of either coal plants, or coal mines, or the companies that invest in those properties,” Daniel said.

The rise of wind

About 36% of all electricity produced in Kansas is from wind, the highest percentage of any U.S. state.

Twenty years ago, there was no such thing.

Part of the rapid growth of the industry is obvious: You wouldn’t put a wind turbine in a place with no wind, and there’s a lot of wind in Kansas.

Plus, federal and state tax incentives encouraged developers to jump into the market.

And it’s increasingly cheaper to build a wind farm.

Just this year, Kansas saw four new wind farms come online, adding enough capacity to power 190,000 homes for a year.

“Will we see four wind projects come online every year for the next five years? No,” said Kimberly Gencur-Svaty, director of public policy at the Kansas Power Alliance. “But I do think we’ll probably continue at a pace of where we’ve averaged the last 20 years, which is a project or two.”

How low can it go?

Ashok Gupta with the Natural Resources Defence Council said the move to renewable energy and subsequent decrease in CO2 emissions will be vital to reducing the impacts of climate change.

But, he wondered if it will be fast enough, especially in states that have a lot of wind.”

“We should be going by 2030 to pretty much carbon-free electricity,” he said.

While some states like Colorado have begun to adopt 100% renewable energy goals, Kansas has not. Even if Kansas were to get to 100% renewable energy, there’s still the nearly 20 million metric tons of transportation emissions to worry about.

Achieving a clean electrical grid will also be key to reducing those emissions, Gupta said, even if it also means another, different shift in the way things are currently done.

“We have to start making sure that our transportation and our buildings are moving to all electric,” he said. “That’s the strategy for the next 10 years.”

Editor's note: This story was corrected  on Dec. 30 to show the coal plants produced gigawatt hours of electricity, not megawatt, and that there are 20 million metric tons of transportation emissions, not 20 metric tons.

Brian Grimmett reports on the environment, energy and natural resources for KMUW in Wichita and the Kansas News Service. You can follow him on Twitter @briangrimmett or email him at [email protected] The Kansas News Service is a collaboration of KCUR, Kansas Public Radio, KMUW and High Plains Public Radio focused on health, the social determinants of health and their connection to public policy.