Nov 27, 2019 12:17 PM

Riley County Arrest Report Wednesday Nov. 27

Posted Nov 27, 2019 12:17 PM

Mcclelland has previous convictions for burglary and drugs, according to the Kansas Department of Corrections.


The following is a summary of arrests, citations by the Riley County Police Department. Those arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


JANET LEE WEDDLE, 64, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $40,000


TANYA RAE WRIGHT, 57, Manhattan, Theft of property or services; < $1500 w/2 or more conv w/in 5 yrs; Shoplifting; Bond $3000


JOSHUA KENDRICK DENTON, 27, Manhattan, Failure to Appear


GLORIA MARIE MYLES, 21, Manhattan, Driving under the influence of drugs/alcohol; 1st conv; blood/breath .08 or >; Bond $1500


JONATHAN DEON MCFARLEY, 27, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $750


ROGER LEE SMITH III, 35, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; held without bond


JESUP SABINA MCCLELLAND, 19, Manhattan, Probation Violation, Bond $15,000


RANDY LAMAR THOMPSON, 28, Manhattan,Domestic battery; Knowing/reckless bodily harm to family/dating relationship; 3+ in 5 yrs; Bond $3000


SKYLAR DOUGLAS SCHEIBLE, 29, Clay Center, Theft of property or services; Value $1,500 to $25,000; All Other Larceny Driving while suspended; 1st conviction Flee or attempt to elude; Commission of any felony; Bond $85000


JOHN ROGER HENRY, 56, Manhattan, Failure to Appear; Bond $4000


DAYSON GAGE KELLEY, 18, Manhattan, Domestic battery; Knowing or reckless bodily harm to family/person in dating relationship Criminal damage to property; Without consent value < $1000; Bond $2000


CASEY RAYMOND AREND, 33, Topeka, Criminal damage to property; Without consent value < $1000 Burglary; Vehicle to commit felony, theft or sexually motivated crime; no bond reported


KYLE MICHAEL HARRIS III, 23, Topeka, Theft of property or services; Value less than $1,500; All Other Larceny; Topeka Police


CITATION REPORT


MICHELLE COONROD, 44, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT BUTTERFIELD RD & CASEMENT RD IN MANHATTAN FOR DISOBEY TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICE (4-12) AND FOR NO PROOF OF MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY (19-200) ON NOVEMBER 25, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 2:40 PM.


ADDISON INGRAM, 19, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 800 BLK MARLATT AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON NOVEMBER 25, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 3:20 PM.


MARIAH BROWN, 24, MILFORD, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 2200 BLK FORT RILEY BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR INATTENTIVE DRIVING (14-104) ON NOVEMBER 23, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 3:54 PM.


RANDY TRENT SR, 48, E, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT LEVEE DR & E POYNTZ AVE IN MANHATTAN FOR FTY RIGHT OF WAY STOP/YIELD (159) ON NOVEMBER 12, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 4:15 PM.


CHUDNEY WILLIAMS, 42, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 700 BLK COLORADO ST IN MANHATTAN FOR IMPROPER BACKING (14-117) ON NOVEMBER 25, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 4:23 PM.


RONALD BOYD, 26, MANHATTAN, KS WAS CITED WHILE AT MM 183 FORT RILEY BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR FAIL TO YIELD EMERGENCY VEHICLE (08-1530) ON NOVEMBER 25, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 5:47 PM.


JERRY POPE, 59, NORTHGLENN, CO WAS CITED WHILE IN THE 2300 BLK TUTTLE CREEK BLVD IN MANHATTAN FOR SPEEDING (7-33) ON NOVEMBER 25, 2019 AT APPROXIMATELY 3:22 PM.

Continue Reading Little Apple Post
Nov 27, 2019 12:17 PM
Kan. foster care agency trains social workers to be ‘personal 911’ for kids

Kansas Department for Children and Families' social workers hold up sheets of papers illustrating the story of a 17-year-old boy who they expect in five years to be in prison or dead if they don't find him help. Evert Nelson / The Topeka Capital-Journal


By PEGGY LOWE

Kansas News Service


The foster kid is a 17-year-old boy who was kicked out of his home when he was 10, started using drugs by 13, and in five years is expected to be in prison or dead.


Kansas Department of Children and Families social workers check on him every day and there’s been some progress: He’s now in an independent living facility and he’s not using drugs anymore. But he still has many needs, including a coming heart transplant.


How can he be helped?


About 100 social workers from the Kansas Department for Children and Families considered that question at a bootcamp-stype workshop in Topeka on Friday with Kevin Campbell, creator of a national model called Family Finding.


Campbell said the team assigned to the boy must find relatives or people who care about him and have them intervene in the boy’s life.


“Basically you are building the personal 911 system for this kid,” Campbell said. “We call it a firehouse intervention. Quite literally, he needs a personal fire department ready to help him respond to the life he lives, which is a crisis every day.”


The goal of Family Finding is getting kids connected to someone who loves them in hopes of keeping them out of the foster care system and potentially preventing further trauma. It’s one of several programs DCF has implemented since Gov. Laura Kelly came into office this year aimed at reforming the long-embattled foster care system.


The social workers being trained on Friday came from DCF, the state’s two private contractors, and advocates from the community, said Tanya Keys, deputy DCF secretary. A strategic plan will be formed next month, while training is being implemented across the state, she said.


“The idea is that (social workers) go back and start planting these seeds, talking about these concepts and we'll get materials out to them so we can start that readiness for implementation,” Keys said.

Kevin Campbell, founder of the Center for Family Finding and Youth Connectedness, trains about 100 Kansas social workers Friday in a national model called "Family Finding." Credit Evert Nelson / The Topeka Capital-Journal


Campbell, founder of the Center for Family Finding and Youth Connectedness and a former foster parent, began his research in 2000 after years of hearing “This kid’s got nobody.”


He found that most foster children actually have a large family and that if they could be connected with five to eight adults who would make a “permanent relational commitment” to the child, it could change outcomes.


“The training is really about, how do you heal children who have had such harm done to them?” he said. “And importantly, how do you heal the whole family? Because this kind of generational experience has to stop somewhere.”


The training was sponsored by the Casey Foundation and Aetna Better Health of Kansas, which provides health care services for the state foster care system. Kellie Hans Reid, foster care coordinator with Aetna Better Health of Kansas, said research shows that traumatic experiences affect children’s health. 

Groups of Kansas Department for Children and Families' social workers at a 'Family Finding' boot camp on Friday at the Topeka Capital Plaza Hotel. Credit Evert Nelson / The Topeka Capital-Journal


“That, in turn, will affect their life course and their mortality, their metabolic issues, their cardiac issues,” she said. “What we know is that trauma affects the body.”


After the training this week, the team of social workers went back to the 17-year-old boy they’d been working with. He had told them he didn’t have anyone in his life to help, but through talking with him about people from his past, social workers found some — including a former school principal and a former foster father who taught him jujitsu, a sport he loves.


The social worker, who could not be identified because she works undercover to find missing foster kids, said she was trying to “give him a family, like it doesn’t have to be blood, just someone who cares about him.”


“He went from having two of us,” she said, “to having 26 of us in this week.” 


Peggy Lowe is a reporter at KCUR and is on Twitter at @peggyllowe.